Canadian_Museum_for_Human_Rights.2014

 

June 2015 special double issue of The Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies, featuring critical and reflective work on the new Canadian Museum for Human Rights by Nadine Blumer, Amber Dean, Rita Kaur Dhamoon, Angela Failler, Olena Hankivsky, Peter Ives, Hee-Jung Serenity Joo, Serena Keshavjee, Erica Lehrer, Heather Milne, Julie Pelletier, Kathryn Ready, Mavis Reimer, Karen Sharma, Larissa Wodtke.

Table of Contents

Notes on Contributors

pages 91-95

 

Preface: Thinking Through the Museum

Erica Lehrer

pages 96- 99

 

Introduction: Caring for Difficult Knowledge—Prospects for the Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Angela Failler, Peter Ives and Heather Milne

pages 100- 105

 

Human Rights and/or Market Logic: Neoliberalism, Difficult Knowledge, and the Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Heather Milne

pages 106-124

 

Expanding Museum Spaces: Networks of Difficult Knowledge at and Beyond the Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Nadine Blumer

pages 125-146

 

The CMHR and the Ongoing Crisis of Murdered or Missing Indigenous Women: Do Museums Have a Responsibility to Care?

Amber Dean

pages 147-165

 

Comfort Women in Human Rights Discourse: Fetishized Testimonies, Small Museums, and the Politics of Thin Description

Hee-Jung Serenity Joo

pages 166-183

 

Governing Difficult Knowledge: The Canadian Museum for Human Rights and Its Publics

Karen Sharma

pages 184-206

 

A Lovely Building for Difficult Knowledge: The Architecture of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Larissa Wodtke

pages 207-226

320px-CMHR

Hope Without Consolation: Prospects for Critical Learning at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Angela Failler

pages 227-250

 

Insider/Outsider Ambiguities and the Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Julie Pelletier

pages 251-253

 

Do the Rights Thing?: The Canadian Museum for Human Rights and the MA in Cultural Studies at the University of Winnipeg

Kathryn Ready and Serena Keshavjee

pages 254-260

 

Intersectionality and the Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Rita Kaur Dhamoon and Olena Hankivsky

pages 261-263

 

Closings and Openings: Afterword on “Prospects for the Canadian Museum for Human Rights”

Mavis Reimer

pages 264-267

 

free-articles-banner-e1375114915872